Save the World! Environmental Activism

Now lets take a look at Environmental Activism!  Environmental Activism addresses the physical world and the actions we can take to rid it of harsh destructive practices and transform them into more sustainable practices to create a better place to live. With human collaboration, these youth environmentalist groups address both large and small scale problems that this world faces.

oil-covered-activist

One of the most important themes of these blogs that we look at is to think locally.  In the five college area there are many opportunities to take part in these initiatives and promote change! These blogs specifically are helpful because they work to identify methods of activism everyone can take part in and more importantly let us know how to organize events in a successful way.

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Examples of economic problems that are addressed in these blogs are the unsustainable and injustice of global economy; the discussion over the lack of materials such as minerals, fossil fuels and water as well as climate change.

( Part 1 of a 3 Part series)

Now let looks at some initiatives that are taking place close to home!  Our school, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has taken steps in the right direction in order to help the environmental movement.  We are working towards a better, more environmentally friendly economy. Outside of Franklin, one the dining halls on campus, students have created a Permaculture Garden to help address the problems associated with modern agriculture.

Is 50 miles local? Is 500 miles local? How about 15 feet?

The best part about the UMASS permaculture garden is that students like you can become involved if  you feel it necessary to promote change in this sector.  By reading this blog we learned that this initiative, and other ones like it, have the ability to produce up to 1,000 pounds of vegetable annually.  These veggies will be used to serve the UMASS community at dining facilities all around campus.  This environmental process will also feed the good health of the UMASS students as well.  When food establishments buy local they are also contributing to local economies instead of large food processing corporations.  An exciting point that readers of these blogs can come away with is the ability to understand that the environment and health go hand and hand.

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The Well Trained Activist, a blog based out of New England’s Antioch College, works to promote environmental sustainability especially in the realm of public transportation.  What is original about this blog is that it promotes spot-lighting young activist, specifically college students, who are making initiatives for some type of change.  Students who are featured are working to change the environmental discourse we know today, and make it relative to our world’s needs tomorrow.  One hot topic that is essential to speak about and make known is the need for public transportation.  There has been a widespread down-grade of easily accessible and affordable transportation.  Not only would an incline in this sector provide more opportunities to those who could gain tremendously with easy travel, but the decrease in emissions that we would see with a decline in automobile usage would benefit our planet in such an immense way.

This blog is particularly inspiring because these students have just as much on their plate as each of us do here at UMASS, but somehow they manage to find the time to change the world one little bit at a time.  We must then ask ourselves this question, “Can I make time to make change?”

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